Backgrounder Article from  Parks Canada

Investments in Historic Parks Canada Canals in Quebec

New investments in infrastructure: $173.2 million

 

Planned allocation of investments:

Carillon Canal National Historic Site: $3.5 M

Saint-Ours Canal National Historic Site: $7.674 M

Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal National Historic Site: $10,6 M

Chambly Canal National Historic Site: $18.258 M

Lachine Canal National Historic Site: $131.74 M

Quebec waterways (five canals): $1.5 M

 

The following are examples of work that will be done on Quebec’s historic canals over the next five years.

 

Carillon Canal National Historic Site

Opened in 1833, the Carillon Canal bypassed the rapids of the Ottawa River, specifically those at Long-Sault. Originally built for military purposes, the canal was used for commerce from the outset. Combined with a hydroelectric power plant, this impressive, massive structure is the highest lock in Quebec and is part of a network of canals linking Montréal to Ottawa.

 

Project name: Carillon Canal National Historic Site—Restoration of the Bypass Dam and Lock of the Carillon Dam

Project description: The purpose of the project is to repair the concrete structures and ensure the reliability of canal operations.

 

 

Chambly Canal National Historic Site

Opened in 1843, the Chambly canal, which runs along the Richelieu River, played a key role in Quebec’s forest products industry and in forest product exports to the United States. For more than a century, heavily laden barges proceeded along the nearly 20 km long canal. Its nine locks, eight of which still operate manually, allowed the boats to bypass the rapids and negotiate a significant change in height between the Chambly basin and the Upper Richelieu. A must-see tourist attraction in Montérégie, the Chambly Canal National Historic Site welcomes close to 300,000 visitors during the summer season.

 

Project name: Chambly Canal National Historic Site—Lock Restoration

Project description: The project involves restoration work on the locks of the Chambly Canal to ensure the longevity of the structures and continuity of services for boaters. The work includes replacing the lock gates, upgrading the mechanical and hydraulic systems, and maintaining the walls.

 

Project name: Chambly Canal National Historic Site—Bridge Restoration

Project description: The project involves restoration work on the retractable bridges of the Chambly Canal, including work on the steel and concrete structures, to extend the useful life of the bridges.

 

Project name: Chambly Canal National Historic Site—Superintendent’s House Upgrading and Rehabilitation

Project description: The purpose of the project is to rehabilitate the Superintendent’s House, a heritage building, and bring it up to code to ensure its longevity and promote its use.

 

 

Lachine Canal National Historic Site

Built in 1825 to bypass the Lachine Rapids, the Lachine Canal runs 14.5 km between Montréal’s Old Port and Lake Saint-Louis. The gateway to a network of canals linking the Atlantic to the heart of the continent, the Lachine Canal paved the way for the urbanization of the southwest part of the Island of Montréal. Much more than an inland waterway, the canal is also an accessible urban park with a surprisingly rich history. Each year, more than a million visitors take over the banks of the Lachine Canal. Canal activities and facilities provide an opportunity to explore the history of this industrialization and navigation landmark, while enjoying a unique urban setting.

 

Project name: Lachine Canal National Historic Site—Wall Restoration

Project description: The project involves restoration work on sections of the retaining walls of the Lachine Canal. This work will significantly extend the useful life of the walls, which are much needed to continue activities on the canal and are representative of its evolution.

 

Project name: Lachine Canal National Historic Site—Spillway Restoration

Project description: The project involves restoration work on the spillways of the Lachine Canal, including work on the mechanical system and concrete structures, to ensure the longevity of the structures and facilitate the operations of the canal.

 

Project name: Lachine Canal National Historic Site—Lock Restoration

Project description: The project involves repair work on the locks of the Lachine Canal, mainly on the mechanical systems and masonry, to ensure the longevity of the structures and facilitate the operations of the canal.

 

Project name: Gauron Bridge Lafleur Bridge Restoration

Project description: The project involves restoration work on the steel and concrete structures of the Gauron and Lafleur bridges of the Lachine Canal, to extend their useful life.

 

 

Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal National Historic Site

The Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal connects Lake Saint-Louis and Lake Des Deux-Montagnes at the mouth of the Ottawa River. For a long period of time, it was one of Canada’s most critical transportation links. Originally used for commercial purposes, the Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal became part of the Montréal-Ottawa-Kingston system of navigable inland waterways. Opened in 1843, it was used to transport wood until the start of the 20th century. The Saint-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal provides beautiful spaces for family picnics in the park beside the locks. It is one of the most visited locks in Canada.

 

Project name: Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal National Historic Site—Lock Restoration

Project description: The project involves remedial work on the lock and footbridges.

 

Project name: Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue Canal National Historic Site—Service areas, access and paths

Project description: The purpose of this project is to repair visitor facilities (for example paths, lighting and points of service) to improve the visitor experience.

 

 

Saint-Ours Canal National Historic Site

Opened in 1849, the Saint-Ours Canal is known as the “tenth lock” on the Richelieu River, completing the canal system connecting the St. Lawrence River, the Richelieu River, Lake Champlain and the Hudson River. Located on either side of Darvard Island, the Saint-Ours Canal and Dam were indispensable to international trade between Quebec and New England. Today, the Saint-Ours Canal is an exceptional place for relaxation in a natural setting. The one-of-a-kind Vianney-Legendre Fish Ladder enables threatened species of fish to cross the Saint-Ours Dam to spawn in their traditional breeding grounds. Through a window installed in the fish ladder, visitors may watch the fish going up the river.

 

Project name: Saint-Ours Canal National Historic Site—Dam, Lock and Fish Ladder Restoration

Project description: The project involves repair work on the marine structures of the Saint-Ours Canal, namely the dam, lock and fish ladder, to maintain the navigable waterway.

 

Project name: Saint-Ours Canal National Historic Site—Superintendent’s House Restoration

Project description: The purpose of the project is to repair the Superintendent’s House, in particular to replace the roof, stabilize the foundation and repair the building systems. This work will extend the useful life of this heritage building, the centrepiece of the canal’s landscape.


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