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Archived - CANADA'S NEW GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCES PROJECTS IN SASKATOON FOR THE ASIA-PACIFIC GATEWAY AND CORRIDOR INITIATIVE

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No. GC 020/07
For release May 24, 2007
SASKATOON - The Honourable Carol Skelton, Minister of National Revenue, on behalf of the Honourable David Emerson, Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics, along with His Worship Donald Atchison, Mayor of the City of Saskatoon, today announced $20 million in federal funding for strategic infrastructure projects in Saskatoon under the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative (APGCI).
"These projects will ensure that Saskatchewan remains an integral part of international commerce," said Minister Skelton. "Canada's New Government continues to make tremendous progress on the Initiative, including here in Saskatchewan where these projects will benefit the province's residents and economy."
"Today's investment will contribute significantly to Canada's competitiveness in the rapidly changing world of global commerce, as well as benefit the communities by upgrading local infrastructure," said Minister Emerson. "We are committed to establishing the Gateway as the link between North America and Asia, and will continue to work with the provinces and stakeholders to make it happen."
Two projects, totalling $20 million in APGCI funding, will be undertaken by the City of Saskatoon. The two freeway interchange projects will be at Lorne Avenue and Circle Drive and at Idylwyld Freeway and Circle Drive. These projects will complement the proposed South River Crossing, which will provide a bypass link between the southeast and northwest parts of the city. The projects will also improve access to the Canadian National Railway's (CN) intermodal freight terminal located in Southwest Saskatoon, and facilitate Saskatchewan shippers' participation in Asia-Pacific trade.
The local community will benefit from these projects, which will improve traffic flow, create jobs and improve the quality of life of local residents. These upgrades will have numerous benefits for both the public and trade traffic, including reduced congestion and vehicle emissions, as well as fewer travel delays for trucks crossing the city to access the CN intermodal terminal.
"Today's announcement will contribute to much needed infrastructure improvement, and recognizes Saskatoon's robust economy and our growing position on the international stage," said Mayor Atchison. "We are thankful for the commitments to date and look forward to ongoing partnerships that will lead to the completion of the South River Crossing."
"Saskatchewan has been working closely with the City of Saskatoon over the past months and, as a funding partner with the city, we are pleased the federal government has chosen to invest in the South Circle Drive Corridor. The province, along with the other funding partners, recognizes the investment in this corridor will improve the efficiency of key national and international trade routes, reduce congestion and enhance safety," said the Honourable Eldon Lautermilch, Minister of Highways and Transportation of Saskatchewan. "This investment aligns closely with our new Urban Connector Policy under Transportation for Economic Advantage and the objectives of the APGCI."
The APGCI is a national project that will provide economic benefits to all Canadians. The Government of Canada has committed over $1 billion to the initiative and is working closely with the governments of the four Western provinces, municipal governments, regional transportation agencies and private sector leaders.
The Prime Minister launched the APGCI in October 2006. Progress has already been made in construction, planning, project selection, port amalgamation, policy development, technology application and international cooperation and marketing.
For more information about Canada's APGCI, please visit www.apgci.gc.ca.
A backgrounder with details of the Prairie provinces projects is attached.
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Contacts:
Jennifer Chiu
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics, Ottawa
613-371-1557
Doug Wakabayashi
Saskatchewan Highways and Transportation, Regina
306-787-4804
Terence Scheltema
Director of Communications
Office of the Minister of National Revenue, Ottawa
613-995-2960
His Worship, Mayor Donald Atchison
City of Saskatoon
306-975-3202
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Backgrounder
STRATEGIC INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS UNDER THE
ASIA-PACIFIC GATEWAY AND CORRIDOR INITIATIVE
The Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor is a network of transportation infrastructure, including ports, principal road and rail connections stretching across Western Canada and south to the United States, key border crossings, and major Canadian airports. The network serves all of Canada and the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative (APGCI) aims to take advantage of Canada's strategic location, at the crossroads between the North American marketplace and the booming economies of Asia.
On October 11, 2006, Prime Minister Harper announced the APGCI with an initial investment of
$591 million. A further commitment of $410 million was made in Budget 2007, bringing total federal funding for the APGCI to more than $1 billion. The APGCI is a long-term effort, focusing on infrastructure, policy, governance and operational issues together in one multi-modal, system-based, public-private strategy.
In an era of rapidly moving and integrated global supply chains, policies and investments must consider entire transportation systems—systems that connect, for example, Asia with North America's economic heartland. In this context, making the right investments anywhere along the system benefits all who rely on it, in addition to those in jurisdictions where dollars are invested. That is why the Government of Canada has taken a pan-western, system-based approach to the APGCI.
The Government of Canada's contributions to APGCI projects will improve the transportation system by:
increasing transportation capacity;
reducing congestion at key locations to facilitate Asia-Pacific trade;
improving connections between modes; and
enhancing its efficiency, safety and security.
The Government of Canada's investments will continue to promote increased investments by the private sector and other public sector partners to ensure efficient and seamless connections between the various modes of transportation and improve traffic flows for international cargo.
FUNDING ANNOUNCED IN 2006
As part of the $591 million initially announced in October 2006 for the APGCI, $321 million was invested in immediate measures. These include:
Pitt River Bridge and Mary Hill Interchange ($90 million);
Roberts Bank Rail Corridor: road/rail grade separations ($50 million);
South Fraser Perimeter Road ($102 million);
Twinning of the Trans Canada Highway in Banff National Park ($37 million); and
Regional Transportation Management Centre for the Lower Mainland ($2 million).
FUNDING ANNOUNCED IN MAY 2007
On May 4, 2007, in a speech at the International Conference on Gateways and Corridors in Vancouver, the Prime Minister announced funding for 10 new strategic infrastructure projects. Six of these projects are in B.C. and four in the Prairie provinces. On May 11, 2007, the Honourable David Emerson, Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics, released details on the six B.C. projects:
South Fraser Perimeter Road (an additional $263 million)
North Fraser Perimeter Road ($65 million)
Regional Transportation Management Centre for the Lower Mainland (an additional $5 million)
Roberts Bank Rail Corridor: Road/Rail Grade Separations (an additional $25 million)
Local Road Improvements – Richmond ($4.72 million)
Local Road Improvements – Delta ($0.73 million)
These projects, and the one being announced today, were evaluated through a system-based selection process using detailed criteria concerning international trade volumes and multi-modal system efficiency. The projects will be implemented through cost-shared contribution agreements with the proponents. The federal contribution to all May 2007 projects is conditional on all partners providing agreed funding and meeting all applicable federal and provincial requirements, including environmental assessments, regulatory approvals, completion of due diligence, contribution agreements and final federal project approvals.
NEW APGCI INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING IN SASKATCHEWAN, MAY 24, 2007
1. Freeway Interchange – Saskatoon (Lorne Avenue and Circle Drive)
Location: Saskatoon, Sask.
Proponent: City of Saskatoon
Total Project Cost: $20 million
APGCI contribution: $10 million
2. Freeway Interchange – Saskatoon (Idylwyld Freeway and Circle Drive)
Location: Saskatoon, Sask.
Proponent: City of Saskatoon
Total Project cost: $20 million
APGCI contribution: $10 million
Background: Today, the effective movement of goods through Saskatoon is severely hindered because the main highway links pass directly through the city. A significant number of trucks moving containers through Saskatoon to and from the Canadian National Railway (CN) intermodal terminal must travel on Idylwyld Drive or on Circle Drive North–high-volume arterial roadways that are congested due to through traffic and local use.
The two new interchanges will link the city's existing freeway system with the proposed Perimeter Road system that was designed jointly by the City of Saskatoon and Saskatchewan Highways and Transportation. The Perimeter Road will have numerous benefits both for the public and Asia-Pacific trade traffic, including reduced congestion and travel time delays for trucks crossing the city to access the CN intermodal terminal.
Project Description: The construction of the freeway interchanges located at Lorne Avenue and Circle Drive, and at Idylwyld Freeway and Circle Drive, will complement the proposed South River Crossing, which will provide a bypass link between the southeast and northwest parts of the city.
Benefit to the APGCI: These projects will improve access to CN's intermodal freight terminal in southwest Saskatoon and improve the ability of Saskatchewan shippers to participate in Asia-Pacific trade.
NEW APGCI INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING IN ALBERTA, MAY 24, 2007
Highway 2 and 41 Avenue Intermodal Access
Location: Edmonton, Alta.
Proponent: Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation
Total Project Cost: $150 million
APGCI contribution: $75 million
Background: CPR is planning to build a new intermodal terminal in south Edmonton on 41 Avenue east of Highway 2. To accommodate traffic generated from the new CPR intermodal facility, construction of an intermodal terminal access at Highway 2 and 41 Avenue in Edmonton is required.
By facilitating the relocation of the CPR intermodal facility, this project will improve traffic safety and capacity. The relocation of the CPR intermodal terminal from its current facility will reduce congestion on roads near the existing terminal and increase level of service for shippers that have to move their goods to market. The project will improve connections between different modes of transportation, improve rail and road traffic flows, and facilitate economic development and international trade with Asia-Pacific countries.
Project Description: The construction of a new interchange on Highway 2 and 41 Avenue, including a road/rail grade separation of the CPR tracks east of Highway 2, and improvements on arterial roads in the area, will facilitate the relocation of the CPR intermodal freight terminal from a residential area in Edmonton to a new site at the southern limit of the city.
Benefit to the APGCI: The relocation of the CPR intermodal freight terminal will increase business opportunities for Northern Alberta. The new CPR terminal will have a higher capacity and be located in an area that is more accessible to truck traffic. Relocating the CPR terminal will also reduce congestion at numerous interchanges around the existing terminal and mitigate the effects of increased Asia-Pacific trade on the local community.
NEW APGCI INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING IN MANITOBA, MAY 24, 2007
Northwest Winnipeg Access Project: Component 1
Location: Winnipeg, Man.
Proponent: Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation
Total Project Cost: $68.5 million
APGCI contribution: $33.25 million
Background: Inkster Boulevard was recently approved as a Core Intermodal Connector on Manitoba's portion of the National Highway System. Currently, Inkster Boulevard is a 6.7 km, undivided two-lane roadway that provides access to the Winnipeg International Airport, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Intermodal facility, and numerous trucking depots in northwest Winnipeg. It is often congested because of an at-grade CPR crossing that stretches across Inkster Boulevard at acute angles. Capacity constraints on Inkster Boulevard represent an increasingly serious bottleneck for intermodal trade flows to, from, and through Manitoba. The high volume of trains at the current at-grade rail crossing results in major traffic flow and safety problems. Existing traffic volume on this route ranges from 5,000 to 17,000 vehicles per day with between 1,000 and 2,000 trucks per day. The CPR Mainline has a daily volume of 23 trains per day.
Project Description: This project will involve upgrades to Inkster Boulevard between the Winnipeg Perimeter Highway and Oakpoint Highway. It will include twinning 6.6 km of Inkster Boulevard to a four-lane divided highway, building an interchange at Sturgeon Road, constructing a new overpass at the CPR Mainline, and making interchange improvements at the Northwest Perimeter Highway.
Benefit to the APGCI: These upgrades will improve access to numerous trucking depots, the Winnipeg International Airport, and the CPR intermodal freight terminal. The project will reduce truck travel times and decrease vehicle operating costs to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor. At the same time, by increasing capacity and providing grade separations, the project will mitigate the effect of increased Asia-Pacific trade traffic through fewer accidents and lower emissions–improving safety and reducing environmental impact.
May 2007

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