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Archived - MORE RAILWAY CROSSING IMPROVEMENTS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

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No. H082/06For release July 25, 2006
VICTORIA — The Government of Canada will provide more than $916,000 for 42 safety improvements at railway crossings in British Columbia. This announcement
was made today by the Honourable Chuck Strahl, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food,
Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board and Minister responsible for British
Colombia, on behalf of the Honourable Lawrence Cannon, Minister of Transport,
Infrastructure and Communities.
"Rail transportation is very important to this province, especially as more and
more commodities use this gateway to the Asia-Pacific region markets," said
Minister Strahl. "As train traffic increases along the tracks, more and more
measures need to be put in place to ensure the safety of the residents and
visitors in British Columbia."
Under Transport Canada's grade crossing improvement program, eligible railway
crossings are either upgraded, relocated or closed. Improvements may include
installing flashing lights and gates, adding gates or extra lights to existing
systems, linking crossing signals to nearby traffic lights, modifying operating
circuits, or adding new circuits or timing devices. Up to 80 per cent of the
total cost of the improvements is financed by Transport Canada, with the balance
provided by the railways, municipalities or provinces and territories. Transport
Canada's grade crossing improvement program has committed more than $100 million
to such projects throughout the country over the last decade.
"Whether in the city or in rural areas, where rail tracks and roads meet, there
is a potential for accidents. The projects that receive funding today will make
these intersections safer," said Minister Cannon. "Improving safety at these
crossings will help to enhance the quality of life for Canadians. It also
continues our partnerships with rail companies and communities to make rail
crossings safer for motorists and pedestrians throughout Canada."
Transport Canada supports two other initiatives to improve safety at railway
crossings: Operation Lifesaver, a public education program of the Railway
Association of Canada that has promoted safety at railway crossings since 1981;
and Direction 2006, a partnership of governments, railway companies and their
unions working to reduce collisions and trespassing incidents by 50 per cent
from the 1995 level by the year 2006.
A backgrounder on railway crossing facts and a list of the
crossings scheduled
for improvements are attached.
-- 30 --

Contacts:



Natalie Sarafian
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Transport,
Infrastructure and Communities, Ottawa
(613) 991-0700
Rod Nelson
Communications, Vancouver
Transport Canada
604-666-1675



Transport Canada is online at www.tc.gc.ca. Subscribe to news releases and speeches at apps.tc.gc.ca/listserv/ and keep up-to-date on the latest from Transport Canada.
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BACKGROUNDER
RAILWAY CROSSING FACTS AND TIPS
There are approximately 55,000 public, private and pedestrian
highway/railway crossings in Canada.
In 2005, 38 people were killed and 54 seriously injured in 270 highway/railway
crossing collisions.
Approximately 50 per cent of vehicle/train collisions occur at crossings with
active warning devices (gates, lights, bells).
Trains cannot stop quickly. An average freight train travelling at 100 km/h
requires about 1.1 kilometres to stop. A passenger train traveling at 120 km/h
requires about 1.6 kilometres to stop. That's 14 football fields!
Look for the crossbuck symbol of a highway/railway crossing. Some more-travelled
highway/railway crossings have lights and bells or gates.
Listen for warning bells and whistles. Turn off, or turn down, distracting
fans, heaters and radios until the crossing is safely crossed. Opening the
window helps you to hear better.
Never drive around lowered gates - it's illegal and deadly. If you suspect a
signal is malfunctioning, call the 1-800 number posted on or near the crossing
signal or your local law enforcement agency.
Never race a train to the crossing - even in a tie, you lose.
Do not get trapped on the tracks. Only proceed through a highway/railway
crossing if you are sure you can completely clear the crossing without stopping.
Remember, the train is three feet wider than the tracks on both sides.
If your vehicle stalls on the tracks at a crossing, immediately get everyone
out and far away from the tracks. Move in the direction that the train is
approaching from to avoid being hit by debris, because the momentum of the train
will sweep your vehicle forward.
At a multiple track crossing waiting for a train to pass, watch out for a
second train on the other tracks, approaching in either direction.
Railway tracks, trestles, yards and equipment are private property. Walking or
playing on them is illegal - trespassers are subject to arrest and fines. Too
often the penalty is death.
In 2005, at least 64 people were killed and 18 were seriously injured
while trespassing on railway property.
Do not walk, run, cycle or operate all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) on railway
tracks or rights-of-way or through tunnels.
Cross tracks only at designated pedestrian or railway crossings. Observe
and obey all warning signs and signals.
Do not attempt to hop aboard railway equipment at any time. A slip of the
foot can cost you a limb, or your life.
July 2006

PROVINCE
LOCATION
ROAD
IMPROVEMENT
FEDERAL CONTRIBUTION


British Columbia
Terrace
Kenny St
Constant warning time device & pre-emption
$280,000


British Columbia
Terrace
Kenny St
Constant warning time device & pre-emption
$6,400


British Columbia
Mission
Rte 11 at Harris Rd
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
Smithers
Lake Kathlyn Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Smithers
Lake Kathlyn Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Evelyn
Owen Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Canal Flats
Rte 93/95 at Canal Flats
Active advance warning sign
$2,000


British Columbia
Chetwynd
John Hart Hwy
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Wasa
Rte 95A at Wasa crossing
Active advance warning sign
$2,000


British Columbia
Langley
Rte 10 at Crush Cr
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
Langley
Rte 10 west of Glover St
Active advance warning sign
$2,000


British Columbia
Yale
Albert St
Gates and motion sensing device
$133,120


British Columbia
Armstrong
Hwy #97A
Active advance warning sign and LED lights
$104,000


British Columbia
Hope
6th Ave
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Hope
3rd Ave
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Decker Lake
Rowland Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Vavenby
Vavenby Bridge Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Vavenby
KP Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Chilliwack
Yale Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Chilliwack
Annis Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Vanderhoof
Rte 16 at Burrard Ave
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
Chilliwack
Prest Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Chilliwack
Broadway St
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Chilliwack
Lickman Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Radium Hot Springs
Horsethief Creek Rd
Lights
$28,960


British Columbia
Houston
Tweedie Ave
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
Houston
Tweedie Ave
Pre-emption
$2,720


British Columbia
Houston
Rte 16 at Nadina Ave
Fibre optic
$6,400


British Columbia
Matsqui
Mission Hwy at Matsqui
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Chase
Pine St
Gates and constant warning time device
$224,800


British Columbia
Cranbrook
Rte 3 at King St
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
Telkwa
Telkwa Coal Mine Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Kamloops
Rte 1 at River Rd
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
Kamloops
Rte 1 at Tanager
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
Kamloops
Rte 1 at Vicars Rd
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
Pouce Coupe
Rte 2 east of Pouce Coupe
Active advance warning sign
$2,000


British Columbia
Nelson
Rte 3 at Poplar St
Traffic signals
$6,400


British Columbia
East of 100 Mile
Rte 24 at Lone Butte Rd
Active advance warning sign
$2,000


British Columbia
East of 100 Mile
Rte 24 at Lone Butte Rd
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Bear Lake
John Hart Hwy
LED lights
$3,032


British Columbia
Ft St-John
West Bypass Rd
Active advance warning sign
$2,000


British Columbia
Ft Nelson
Clarke Lake Rd
Active advance warning sign
$6,400


TOTAL



$916,976

July 2006

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